Lazy loading images is a practice that’s been popular for a decade and for good reason: images are usually the heaviest downloads on a given webpage and avoiding unloading images that are never seen saves the user bandwidth. There are plugins for lazy loading images in every JavaScript framework, or you could use Intersection Observer API, but it’s become such a common practice that there should probably be a browser API to accommodate it…and Chrome is implementing just that. Let’s have a look at how the incoming native lazy loading API will work!

This new lazy loading API come down to a simple loading=”lazy” attribute and value on img tags:

<img src=”path/to/logo.png” loading=”lazy”>

To experiment with this new API, you can add an onLoad attribute to the image:

<img src=”path/to/logo.png” loading=”lazy” onload=”alert(‘Loaded!’);”>

When the user scrolls within range of the image, the download and render is triggered. There are three values for this…


This is only a snippet of a Website Design Article written by David Walsh

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